WHAT telescope is used to see galaxies?

The Hubble Space Telescope makes one orbit around Earth every 95 minutes. The Hubble Space Telescope took this picture of the Tadpole Galaxy and its tail of large, bright blue star clusters. The “Hubble Ultra Deep Field” shows many galaxies far from Earth.

Can you see galaxies through a telescope?

Galaxies are some of the most distant objects we can observe. While most planets, stars, and nebulae are usually pretty nearby to us, we can observe galaxies that are millions of light-years away. … Even if a galaxy is bright, the most you might typically see is its core with a 4-inch telescope.

Can I see galaxies with a refractor telescope?

yes, you can “see galaxies” with smaller aperture, especially if you first find them with a larger aperture (note: larger aperture required).

What can you see with a 100mm telescope?

What Can You Expect From 100mm Telescopes? (With Photos)

  • The maximum magnitude of a 100mm telescope is 13.6. For reference, the Moon has a magnitude of -12.74 and Mars has a magnitude of -2.6. …
  • The Moon. The Moon looks amazing in these telescopes. …
  • Mars. …
  • Venus. …
  • Jupiter. …
  • Saturn and Neptune. …
  • Pluto and Dwarf Planets. …
  • Mercury.
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What can I see with a 70mm telescope?

The colorful bands and belts of Jupiter, as well as its four major moons, and the rings of Saturn are clearly visible in a 70mm telescope. Mars, Venus and Mercury are visible in a small scope as well, but are extremely reluctant to give up any detail because of their overwhelming brightness.

How powerful does a telescope have to be to see the rings of Saturn?

The rings of Saturn should be visible in even the smallest telescope at 25x [magnified by 25 times]. A good 3-inch scope at 50x [magnified by 50 times] can show them as a separate structure detached on all sides from the ball of the planet.

What magnification do you need to see galaxies?

In practice, the optimum magnification for most objects is somewhere between about 8× and 40× per inch of aperture — toward the low end for most deep-sky objects (star clusters, nebulae, and galaxies) and the high end for the Moon and planets.

How big of a telescope do I need to see Andromeda?

These targets can be seen with a refractor under 4 inches or a reflector/SCT under 6 inches. With bigger telescopes, you’ll see a galaxy with spiral arms that’s similar to the Milky Way.

What can you see with a 150mm telescope?

150-180 mm refractors, 175-200 mm reflectors and catadioptric telescopes:

  • binary stars with angular separation of less than 1″, faint stars (up to 14 stellar magnitude);
  • lunar features (2 km in diameter);
  • Clouds and dust storms on Mars;
  • 6-7 moons of Saturn, planetary disk of Titan may be observed;
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What can you see with a 130mm telescope?

With a 130mm (5. 1″) aperture size, the Polaris 130 will deliver bright, clear images for the aspiring astronomer to enjoy. Whether you’re viewing the Moon, planets, or deep-sky objects such as nebulae, galaxies, and star clusters, the view through the Polaris 130 will keep you looking up for a long time.

What can I see with a 40x telescope?

At 40x you can use the scope for several astro viewing aspects: Clusters, Open and Globular, double stars, some nebula – M42 being the obvious. Depending on how dark your skies are some planetary nebula. And as ever in this hobby there is the moon.

What can you see through a 90mm telescope?

A 90mm telescope will provide you with a clear view of the Saturn along with its rings, Uranus, Neptune, and Jupiter with its Great Red Spot. You can also expect to see stars with 12 stellar magnitude with a 90mm telescope.

Which is better 60mm or 70mm telescope?

However, a 70 mm refractor (which collects 36% more light than a 60mm telescope) is considered by many amateur astronomers to be the minimum size for a good quality beginner refractor telescope. It is acceptable for observing bright objects like lunar details, planets, star clusters, and bright double stars.

What can you see with a 500mm telescope?

A 500mm telescope will yield a lunar image that’s about 5mm across in a DSLR camera with a full-frame, 35mm-format sensor; a 1,500mm telescope will produce a 14mm image, and a 2,000mm telescope results in an 18mm image.