Why can’ti see planets through my telescope?

Planets are small and far enough away that they will never fill a significant portion of your field-of-view, even at you scope’s highest usable magnification. If you want to see a larger disk, you need to use a higher power eyepiece. … Your scope will show a larger disk than what you are seeing now.

Why can’t I see anything through my telescope?

If you are unable to find objects while using your telescope, you will need to make sure the finderscope is aligned with the telescope. … Once the crosshairs are centered on the same object you are viewing through the telescope eyepiece, the alignment of the finderscope is done.

Why is everything blurry through my telescope?

Too High Magnification

Too high a magnification is the leading cause of most telescope images being too blurry to be classified accurately. Any magnification above 200X may make images unclear in certain atmospheric conditions. The magnification on a humid summer night will not be the same as during a winter night.

Why can’t I get my telescope to focus?

Many refractors rely on the star diagonal to bring the eyepiece into the focusing range of the telescope, so if you can’t get anything to focus, make sure you always have the diagonal in place between the eyepiece and the telescope. … The Moon should have a crisp edge to it, and stars should focus down to a point.

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Why is it black when I look through my telescope?

If you can see the shadow of the secondary mirror (black circle) and/or spider vanes while viewing through the eyepiece, the telescope is not focused. … If you want to make the focused image larger, you will need to use a higher power eyepiece.

Why can’t I see anything through my telescope at night?

If you can’t see anything clearly through your telescope at night, try using the scope in daylight first. … In a reflector, it is the small tube sticking out of the side nearly at the front end of the telescope. Insert your eyepiece in the tube and then tighten the setscrew(s) to hold it securely.

How powerful does a telescope have to be to see planets?

Experienced planetary observers use 20x to 30x per inch of aperture to see the most planetary detail. Double-star observers go higher, up to 50x per inch (which corresponds to a ½-mm exit pupil). Beyond this, telescope magnification power and eye limitations degrade the view.

Why is Jupiter blurry through my telescope?

You might be using too much magnification, either for the conditions, or for your scope. There also could be local issues involved, such as seeing conditions, trying to view a low planet over houses or other manmade stuff that put off heat, possibly haze, etc. Jupiter being low doesn’t help.

How many telescope eyepieces do I need?

Typically, a collection of four – 6mm, 10mm, 15mm and 25mm – will cover most observing requirements. A good selection of eyepieces will serve you well and give you options depending on what you want to observe.

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How much magnification do you need to see Jupiter?

Generally a magnification of 30-50x the aperture of your telescope (in inches) works well on nights of average seeing. So if you have a 4-inch telescope, try 120x to 200x. If you have razor sharp optics and steady sky, you can get away with even more magnification.

Does it have to be dark to use a telescope?

Just because a telescope is normally used during evening hours doesn’t mean you have to set it up in the dark! … Once you are finished with assembly, stay indoors and take some time to learn a bit more about its features before you take your telescope outside for the first time.